Concert hits the right note for patients

Musicians Matthew Cleghorn and Ben Hayward, patient Irene Culkin and WWL Cancer Care staff at the Music In Hospitals concert
Musicians Matthew Cleghorn and Ben Hayward, patient Irene Culkin and WWL Cancer Care staff at the Music In Hospitals concert
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CANCER patients at Wigan Infirmary were given a musical treat as two well-known local artists dropped in to provide them with some melodic therapy.

Duo Matthew Cleghorn and Ben Hayward hit the right notes during a 60-minute concert on the hospital’s Cancer Care Ward.

Organised by Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh (WWL) NHS Foundation Trust’s Oncology Unit in partnership with the charity Music in Hospitals, the concert is part of WWL’s strategy to offer cancer patients a range of complementary therapies, alongside conventional medical treatment.

“Music concerts improve the quality of life for people with cancer,” says WWL Cancer Care Ward Manager, Leo Anson. “Through the joy and therapeutic benefits of professionally performed live entertainment, music has a real benefit for patients living with cancer and I would like to thank Music In Hospitals for volunteering their time and talent for the benefit of our patients.”

Music is the latest complementary therapy offered to help patients and their families cope with cancer and reinforce the healing environment at Wigan Infirmary. The Music In Hospitals concert follows the recent introduction of weekly reiki therapy sessions provided by volunteer therapists and funded by donations to the hospital’s Three Wishes charity.

Leo added: “Music concerts are part of our commitment to providing complementary therapies which improve the quality of life for our cancer patients.”

Music in Hospitals is a registered charity, whose mission is to improve the quality of life of adults and children with all kinds of illness and disability through the joy and therapeutic benefits of live music.

Established in 1948, Music in Hospitals has grown into the leading provider of live music across the healthcare spectrum. In the region of 5,000 concerts are presented each year to audiences of all ages in hospitals, care homes, hospices, day care centres and special needs schools throughout the UK.

In 2008 they celebrated their 60th anniversary. From its beginning Music in Hospitals aimed for the highest standard of music. And 168 concerts took place in 1948 with audience sizes ranging from 100 to 700 people in enormous hospital halls with women on one side and men on the other. The musicians were remote, on a high stage, with no opportunity to interact.