Shop owner Howard recycles fat for fuel

Howard Gallimore of "Mr Chips" on Hallgate turning used frying oil into diesel with staff Diane Grimshaw and Louise Leather

Howard Gallimore of "Mr Chips" on Hallgate turning used frying oil into diesel with staff Diane Grimshaw and Louise Leather

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FRYING tonight ... motoring tomorrow? Hallgate’s very own Mr Chips certainly hopes so after signing up to a new ‘green’ scheme.

Chip shop owner Howard Gallimore has all his old vegetable oil which has been used to cook everything from battered sausages to fillets of cod sent away for recycling and a new life.

It’s being blended with other oils and used for biofuel for the increasing number of diesel cars and vans that can run happily on it.

Mr Gallimore, who also owns Gallimore’s Fine Dining restaurant in The Wiend and Cafe Select on Hallgate, is recycling more than 180 litres of used vegetable oil a week which once headed for the tip.

The actual processing is done by an eco-recycling firm over the border in West Lancashire, who bring a mini tanker to collect it.

He is so fascinated by the process he could well invest in a vehicle with a modified diesel engineer that can run off the chip oil fuel in future

Mr Gallimore said: “I like to think of myself as green and to run the business in as environmentally friendly way wherever we can and we already re-use all the old paper potato bags which were once screwed up and thrown away as our new bin bags to fill with our waste.

“The thing about this is that when the tubs are full of waste oil we need them emptying reliably whatever is going to happen to the stuff.

“I’m led to believe that there is no aroma from fish and chips, or a pizza shop, or whatever when the stuff comes out again as a type of natural fuel.

“I love the traditional smell of fish and chips, of course, but I assume that would be a problem for the product if it did because not everybody would agree.”

Howard drives a diesel fuelled car himself. And says he loves the idea of one day motoring on the previous week’s cod and chips or battered sausage.

Since a law change, it is now legal to make up to 2,500 litres of your own biodiesel - enough to run the average family car - without having to pay tax.

So called ‘home brewers’ can convert chip fat using special kits from firms now reporting a steady rise in sales. However, the AA says using clean vegetable oil is possible in cars with older pumps but it can still affect the injectors.