£1m a year savings expected as new recycling centre takes shape

Left to right: Andrew Sharrock, Andrea Yates, Coun Kevin Anderson and Steve Cassie (all Wigan Council) with Ian Norcross from Warden Construction at the green waste recycling station topping out ceremony
Left to right: Andrew Sharrock, Andrea Yates, Coun Kevin Anderson and Steve Cassie (all Wigan Council) with Ian Norcross from Warden Construction at the green waste recycling station topping out ceremony
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A MILLION-pound structure which will make Wigan borough a greener place for years to come is taking shape.

The new £1.4m “organic waste transfer station,” based next to the Kirkless household waste and recycling centre in Ince, will receive all of the borough’s food and garden waste.

Construction work started last autumn and the huge structure now has its roof in place.

It is hoped construction will be completed by the spring.

The transfer station will receive up to 25,000 tonnes of waste every year. This waste will then be transferred to another site for composting.

It will be big enough to accept 10 vehicles full of green waste tipping twice a day. At its peak in spring and summer it will cope with 900 tonnes of green waste a week.

The facility, along with other waste procurement contracts being undertaken by the council, will save the borough’s council tax payers £1 million a year.

To mark the roof being in place a ‘topping out ceremony’ took place with representatives from Wigan Council and site manager Ian Norcross for Lancashire-based Warden Construction.

Ian said: “I am very pleased with how the project is going. The roof is on and we are now working on external cladding and doors and windows.

“It has been enjoyable and productive working with Wigan Council and we are looking forward to completion.”

Coun Kevin Anderson, cabinet member for environment at Wigan Council, said: “Work is progressing very well and we are grateful for Warden Construction for managing the project so well.

“We are looking forward to the completion of the construction phase.

“Once open the station will help us boost our recycling rates and contribute to the millions of pounds in savings that have already been made since new recycling arrangements were introduced in 2012.”

The facility has been specifically designed to minimise environmental impacts such as cladding to reduce noise and an odour management system with fast-action roller shutter doors to minimise and contain smells.

The station will also provide more space and less vehicle movements at the existing Kirkless Transfer station resulting in improved rates of recycling.