A poem for murdered police officers

PC Amie Holland and (below) murdered officers Bone and Hughes
PC Amie Holland and (below) murdered officers Bone and Hughes

A WIGAN police officer has written a poignant poem in tribute to her murdered colleagues.

PC Amie Holland felt moved to put pen to paper after hearing of the horrific deaths of PC Fiona Bone, 32, and PC Nicola Hughes, 23, who were killed last week while on duty.

BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE. Undated Greater Manchester Police handout photo of of Pc Fiona Bone, 32, and Pc Nicola Hughes (right), 26, as a vigil will be held today to mark the time one week ago when the two policewoman were gunned down answering a routine call. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 25, 2012. Today some of their colleagues will join members of the community in Hattersley to hold a vigil to remember the officers. Police are expected to arrive from around 10.45am close to the crime scene on Abbey Gardens. See PA story POLICE Vigil. Photo credit should read: Greater Manchester Police/PA Wire ''NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE. Undated Greater Manchester Police handout photo of of Pc Fiona Bone, 32, and Pc Nicola Hughes (right), 26, as a vigil will be held today to mark the time one week ago when the two policewoman were gunned down answering a routine call. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 25, 2012. Today some of their colleagues will join members of the community in Hattersley to hold a vigil to remember the officers. Police are expected to arrive from around 10.45am close to the crime scene on Abbey Gardens. See PA story POLICE Vigil. Photo credit should read: Greater Manchester Police/PA Wire ''NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

Amie, who works in Bolton but lives in Norley Hall, has written a poem in memory of the two women after they were shot down by a gunman.

PC Holland, said: “I did not know the girls personally, but a loss of two of our own is felt across the force.

“Therefore I wanted to do something to honour their memory.

“I have written this poem and I dedicate it to my two incredibly brave colleagues.

“I want to share this poem with as many people as possible. Rest in peace girls.”

The poem is the officer’s personal account of the tragic day and PC Holland said she hopes to get across just how much the force has been touched by the deaths.

Amie’s poem:

The alarm clock goes off, it’s early in the morn,

I rub my eyes as I let out a yawn.

As I dress my mind wonders of the day that lies ahead,

as I count the hours until I can return to my bed.

Another working day as I creep from my house,

leaving loved ones to sleep, I’m as quiet as a mouse.

My car pulls from the drive, the radio blurs into life,

what will the day bring, what troubles, what strife?

There it is, my nick, I see it, I care,

as I pass by the badge I so proudly wear.

Vest on, belt on, to the parade room I go,

to my colleagues and friends, banter in full flow.

We’re briefed up and ready for the challenges of the day,

to serve and protect in every single way.

In our panda we patrol listening so carefully,

to the radio on which a call soon will there be.

And it comes, it’s inevitable, a job there for us,

a call for help, for the help of ‘the fuzz.’

“On route” I say as we continue to chat,

most likely about refs or of this and of that.

All so quickly we arrive, to the house we draw near,

then I see him, it’s him, I cannot move with fear.

The most wanted man standing here in front of me,

then I see it, there’s a bang, all is still, this cannot be.

It’s dark, I’m alone, “What happened?” I say,

why did this become that dreaded day?

I have a family, a life stretching out before me,

though most just don’t see it, she’s just another PC.

Yes I have seen and done things that most of you fear,

for the job and the badge that I hold oh so dear.

But I’m not just a uniform, I’m a person too,

yes I may be a bobby, but I’m someone’s daughter like you.

But today I have made the ultimate sacrifice,

with my life I have paid the largest price.

With pride and integrity, I did serve and protect,

though at times it was hard and we were shown no respect.

But it was our job, off we went, so professional and formal,

not knowing this day would be anything but normal.

I have no regrets, the service I willingly gave,

day in and day out, I never saw it as brave.

And now I move on, new friends most I meet,

as I walk my shift on heaven’s beat.

But please don’t forget me, on parade I once sat,

just a girl who happened to wear a bobby’s hat.