Clean-up on after flooding mayhem

Scot Lane Bridge flooded
Scot Lane Bridge flooded
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STORM-lashed Wigan was doing its best to return to normal today after days of flooding chaos.

Cleaning-up operations began across the borough yesterday as the foul weather began to ease.

Roads were closed and commuters delayed as Wigan Council and the Enviroment Agency worked around the clock to tackle rising waters during the first half of the week.

Most badly affect roads have now been re-opened including Mort Lane in Atherton and the Saddle Junction in Newtown.

The council sent teams out to Saddle, Martland Mill and Eleanor Street, which had previously been under way and spent hree and a half hours cleaning and litter-picking. They also left a skip on Eleanor Street for residents affected by the floods to use.

Martyn Kenyon, Wigan Council’s Head of Audit and Risk Management, said: “We’d like to thank residents for their understanding and patience during this difficult time.

“Council staff have been working hard to protect properties and support residents affected. We’ve been supplying sandbags and offering advice on how to protect homes.

“We’ve also experienced significant problems on the borough’s road network. We are now getting back to normal as surface water is receding. We would urge everyone to remain vigilant and be prepared in case we experience further downpours.”

During the extreme weather, the Enviroment Agency have protected 610 homes and 170 businesses.

A spokesman for the Enviroment Agency said: “Our thoughts are with Wigan residents this week. Fortunately river levels are now falling across the region. We have invested £12m in the construction of Wigan dam flood alleviation scheme. This works by storing large volumes of water upstream away from properties.

“We will continue to monitor river levels and to ensure the dam remains as effective as possible and we have staff out and about to advise people who have been affected on how to clear up.”

For more details, visit the Environment Agency’s website: www.environment-agency.gov.uk/flood.