Campaign to cut attacks

Greater Manchester Police's One Punch Can Kill campaign logo
Greater Manchester Police's One Punch Can Kill campaign logo

A HARD-hitting campaign aimed at cutting drink-fuelled violence is taking to the streets.

Police officers are working with licensed premises and taxi firms across the borough to promote the One Punch Can Kill campaign.

It aims to spread the word that too much drink can turn a good night into a tragic disaster with people behaving in ways they would not do normally.

Inspector Ian Kennedy, of the Leigh Neighbourhood Policing Team, said: “We’re not trying to spoil anyone’s fun, but people need to realise that when you’ve had too much alcohol you leave yourself more open to becoming a victim of crime or getting yourself and others in trouble by behaving violently.

“It only takes one punch to kill someone and destroy the lives of people’s families.

“People who have had a drink do things they wouldn’t dream of doing when they’re sober, and a stupid, split-second reaction can have devastating consequences.

“We’re appealing to people to think about their actions – avoid trouble and try not to get into arguments or vulnerable situations. By keeping control of your temper and walking away you could avoid destroying your life and that of others.”

Posters, window stickers and beer mats are being displayed in pubs, clubs and bars across the borough’s town centres.

The scheme has highlighted that young men aged 18-25 are the most likely to commit and be victims of serious violent crime. Forty per cent of victims of violent and serious violent crime are young men and the vast majority of offenders are men – 77 per cent of violent crime and 86 per cent of serious violent crime.

Alcohol-fuelled violence has claimed the lives of 13 people across Greater Manchester over the past five years. Simon Carley, Professor in Emergency Medicine at Manchester Royal Infirmary, said: “Emergency departments regularly deal with patients who have been assaulted. Many suffer permanent injury from fractures, scarring or brain injury.

“It cannot be right that young men and women in our society are suffering long-term disability as a result of alcohol-fuelled violence.

“A single punch or scuffle in a bar can lead to death or disability for the victim, and a long prison sentence for the assailant. The lives of both, plus families and friends, are ruined by these pointless acts.”