D-day for strip club

Exterior of Baby Platinum, King Street, Wigan
Exterior of Baby Platinum, King Street, Wigan
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A CONTROVERSIAL application to renew the licence of a Wigan town centre strip club will be decided at a public hearing next week.

Owners of the Baby Platinum club on King Street have applied to the council to grant a continuation of their current permission to trade.

Given the large number of licensed premises operating in King Street and the number of people present, especially at weekends, I believe the area constitutes a saturation zone and that the establishment of this premises has an impact on health and safety and, as a consequence, may have an impact on the likelihood of criminal activity in the area

Lisa Nandy

But local authority bosses have received a number of objections to the bid – including from the town’s MP – and have called for a special meeting to consider their options.

Council documents reveal that although the discussion part of the town hall meeting will be held in public, regulation committee members will “deliberate and seek legal advice” privately.

The club’s current licence allows performers to “remove g-strings during a dance” but that they “must be replaced at the conclusion.”

Documents for Wednesday’s meeting show that the club’s parent company ABA Leisure and directors have no criminal convictions and run similar premises in Manchester and Derby.

It adds that Trading Standards officials have investigated three complaints about the premises, all of which resulted in no further action being taken.

One such complaint detailed how a male had queried the amount debited from his bank account after he had purchased “some drinks and one dance.”

Licensing officers found he had “paid for and agreed to six dances and spent £200 on drinks.”

Among those to voice opposition to the club is Wigan’s MP Lisa Nandy who has written to the council.

Her letter said: “Given the large number of licensed premises operating in King Street and the number of people present, especially at weekends, I believe the area constitutes a saturation zone and that the establishment of this premises has an impact on health and safety and, as a consequence, may have an impact on the likelihood of criminal activity in the area.”

Ms Nandy also cited Birmingham City Council refusing a similar application on the grounds that granting such a licence would be

inappropriate because of the impact on the “character of the locality”.

If councillors decide to reject the application, the owners are able to appeal the decision at Magistrates’ Court within 28 days.