Defibrillators put in public places to aid emergencies

Sue Carey from Bowen and Leeming Opticians with North West Ambulance Service paramedic Steve Nicholls
Sue Carey from Bowen and Leeming Opticians with North West Ambulance Service paramedic Steve Nicholls
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NEW defibrillators have been placed in two public locations in Wigan to help with emergency situations.

The move is part of a North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) initiative to place the life-saving pieces of equipment where there could be a higher risk of a cardiac arrest occurring.

Members of the Standish community and Friends of Standish Library, with the newly installed defibrillator, positioned outside TWC, Wigan Road, Standish

Members of the Standish community and Friends of Standish Library, with the newly installed defibrillator, positioned outside TWC, Wigan Road, Standish

This includes sports facilities, shopping centres, transport links and others where there is a high volume of visitors. NWAS will also support schools, companies, voluntary organisations in placing their own defibrillators – the details of which are then logged with 999 Control to advise if there is a cardiac arrest at the scene.

They will be located close to the Wiper Company in Standish and Bowen and Leeming opticians in Ashton.

Steve Nicholls, Community Resus Officer for North West Ambulance Service said: “NWAS are pleased to have been involved in placing the defibrillator and case in Ashton and also the two defibrillators in Standish. We have been working closely with the Friends of Standish Library.

“We are looking at doing training sessions for the local businesses and the public in the areas so people know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest.

“When someone goes into cardiac arrest it is vital to recognise the emergency, start CPR but also to get the defibrillator and apply the pads.

“The 999 Centre will give the code which will allow the person to obtain the defibrillator. The machines are so simple to use and you really cannot do any further harm to the patient.

“They only allow you to deliver a shock if a patient is in a specific rhythm. The defibrillator delivers an electric pulse through the chest, in an attempt to restore normal heart rhythm.

“A patient’s chance of survival decreases 10 per cent for every one minute that passes without defibrillation. With the application of a defibrillator within five minutes of collapse the best possible chance of survival is maintained.”