Student Dragons pitch for charity cash

Students from Wigan and Leigh College with Falling Leaf, The Christie and Joseph Goal representatives
Students from Wigan and Leigh College with Falling Leaf, The Christie and Joseph Goal representatives
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STUDENTS are determined to raise vital funds for two charities with a Dragon’s Den-style showdown.

Wigan and Leigh College teenagers are undertaking a new project which will see them pitch plans to collect money for two causes: The Christie hospital and Joseph’s Goal.

The task has been up by organisation, Falling Leaf, who, alongside the college, will provide £1,000 to fund the most successful idea.

Director Chris Devany said: “It’s a fantastic opportunity for the students to not only raise funds for the local charities but also to increase their employment skills.

“Falling Leaf will take the students under our wing and they will get to complete some work experience in our offices where they will be planning their pitches and working in an office environment. This element of the project is extremely important as there is such a shortfall of work in Wigan at the moment so it will help them to become a more desirable candidate in an interview. All of the students have to have an element of volunteering on their CV in order to complete their course and so this will give them a focus to learn and develop.

“We have already held our first conference with the chosen teenagers and they’re all very excited and can’t wait to get their teeth stuck into the project.”

Students from the college’s business, IT and public services courses will take on the challenge which will see six teams set three objectives.

These are to raise awareness for Falling Leaf, to raise awareness for the nominated charities and to raise funds for the nominated charities.

The teenagers will have until the end of January 2014 to pitch their perfect plan.

Joseph’s Goal was set up by Wigan Evening Post sports reporter Paul Kendrick to fund research into non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, the condition from which his four-year-old son Joseph suffers.