Hospital’s apology as gran dies

Maureen Halsall of Skelmersdale died in Southport Hospital
Maureen Halsall of Skelmersdale died in Southport Hospital
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A HOSPITAL has apologised to a family over the death of their grandmother.

Grandmother-of-eight and great grandmother-of-four Maureen Halsall, 75, was admitted to Southport Hospital on August 13 this year for confusion, and died seven days later.

Susan Halsall, whose mother-in-law Maureen died in Southport Hospital, pictured with her husband Declan and Maureen's husband John

Susan Halsall, whose mother-in-law Maureen died in Southport Hospital, pictured with her husband Declan and Maureen's husband John

Her daughter-in-law, Susan Halsall, 37, claimed staff did not feed Maureen, of Skelmersdale, nor did they change her bedding after she had wet herself and in another incident her arm was trapped between the bed railings, causing her pain.

Susan, who also lives in Skelmersdale, said: “Staff told us her condition was not life threatening, but in the night time, she died.

“Doctors would not do tests unless we told them to. They did a scan on her brain and stomach and told us it was clear and the next day the doctor told us it was not clear.

“They did not want to know because she was old - they just left her.

“They would not feed her, so we had to take food in for her. We then had to get a nurse to change her bed because she had wet herself.

“The staff were always harsh with us and we always had to ask them to do things which you would expect to be done automatically in hospital.

“We visited her every day, but because of her confusion, she didn’t know us.

“It has left us devastated and we are taking further action. I want justice - she deserved to live.”

Susan has made a formal complaint about Maureen’s death and a spokesman from the Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust issued an apology.

Liz Yates, director of nursing and quality, said: “The Trust sets high standards for itself and its staff.

“I do not shy away from saying so when we fall short of them.

“Mrs Halsall’s case was investigated in detail. We have apologised for where her quality of treatment was not to the standard I expect, the Trust aims for and our patients deserve.

“The Trust aims to get every patient’s treatment right – and in most cases we do.

“But on the occasions we don’t, being open and responsive to criticism helps us try to put things right for the future.

“We have extended an open invitation to Mrs Halsall’s family to meet again should they wish, to discuss the case further and answer any additional questions they may have.”