DCSIMG

End of the road for bone jarring potholes

Coun Paul Prescott in the carpark at the shops in City Road, Kitt Green, which is to have its pot holes filled in

Coun Paul Prescott in the carpark at the shops in City Road, Kitt Green, which is to have its pot holes filled in

HUGE potholes and the uneven surface of a busy Wigan road are to receive a welcome levelling.

Couns Paul and Jeanette Prescott have been working with Wigan Council fill in craters both in the shopping precinct car park off City Road, Kitt Green, and the adjoining highway.

The scheme is part of the authority’s 2013/14 programme of work for carriageway micro-asphalt (a finer grain of road covering which is low noise and skid-preventing), and is expected to cost around £2,000.

Coun Paul Prescott said: “There is a big problem with the car park near the shops in City Road, as it is well used by people.

“After speaking with the highways department, engineers have confirmed that in the short term that they will fill the pot holes in and between April and end of May, the car park will be resurfaced.

“We are happy because a lot of our constituents use it quite a lot.

“We are very grateful to the highways department for what they are doing, in particular during these tough economic times.”

Wigan Council’s director of environment, Terry Dunn, said: “The highway outside the shops on City Road, Kitt Green, is adopted and maintained by the council. Pot holes have been identified there following a scheduled safety inspection and are due to be repaired. Preventative maintenance is now appropriate in order to prolong the life of the carriageway at that location and it has been recommended for a micro-asphalt treatment.

“This is a highway maintenance process that has been used nationally for many years and is an effective and economical method of treating bitumen macadam carriageways.

“The work on this carriageway will be undertaken during Wigan Council’s 2013/14 programme of work for carriageway micro-asphalt, due to commence during the spring of 2013.

“The cost of resurfacing, including preparation costs, is estimated at £2,000 and the new surface is expected to last for a minimum of five years.”

 

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