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Lover’s bid for share of house cash is rejected

News story

News story

A DOOMED romantic who proposed to his girlfriend by presenting her with flowers, wine and soil from his mother’s grave, has been told by a judge that he has no legal stake in their £150,000 home.

Love-lorn tree surgeon Andrew Wing never fulfilled his wish to marry former lover Lorraine Eades, 40, and has now taken a hit in the pocket to go with his broken heart, after Judge Edward Mitchell ruled that his ex owns 100% of the home they once shared.

The couple moved into the property in Braeside Crescent, Billinge, Wigan, together in 2004, had a daughter in 2008, and were engaged to be married, but split in 2010.

The rejected Romeo subsequently sued Ms Eades, claiming that, although the house was in her sole name, he had a stake in it, having made contributions to the mortgage and improvements and upkeep of the property, in the expectation that they would marry.

But Judge Mitchell, sitting at the First-Tier Tribunal, in a decision which has only just been made public, rejected his financial claim.

Ms Eades earlier told the judge she had rejected Mr Wing’s proposal.

“She gave a graphic account of Mr Wing coming to the door of the house one evening, carrying flowers, a bottle of wine and a bag of soil.

“He told her that he had dug the soil from the field where his mother’s ashes had been scattered and then asked her to marry him. She refused and closed the door.”

The judge found that the couple had indeed been engaged at one point, but nevertheless dismissed Mr Wing’s claim.

He found there had been no common intention that he would have a share in the property, as Ms Eades had paid the mortgage, whilst his contributions had been towards household bills.

Work he had done on the property and in the garden had been done “out of natural love and affection” rather than in expectation of a share and had not materially added to the value of the house, the judge said.

Piling on the misery, he also ordered Mr Wing to pay the costs of the case.

 
 
 

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