Look forward to a long and healthy life ...

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WIGANERS can look forward to longer, healthier lives but the borough’s health still lags behind wealthier areas, new research claims.

The borough’s life expectancy will continue to rise until 2030 but Wiganers will still die earlier than the average person in England and Wales, according to new figures published in a leading medical journal.

It is encouraging to see these figures will help Wigan borough push through the average life expectancy above 80 years old by 2019 for men and women and well into the 80s by 2030

Prof Kate adern

On one level the figures show good news for the borough with life expectancy continuing onwards and upwards, with the average Wiganer able to look forward to reaching their 80th birthday by 2019 and making it to 84 by 2030.

However, residents will still expect shorter lives than others in better-off areas, with the England and Wales average set to exceed 85 by 2030 and women’s life expectancy reaching almost 90.

The figures show life expectancy in Wigan is currently 78.88 years, but this is expected to rise to 80.59 years by 2020 and 82.36 years by 2025.

Prof Kate Ardern, director of public health at Wigan Council, said: “It is encouraging to see these figures will help Wigan borough push through the average life expectancy above 80 years old by 2019 for men and women and well into the 80s by 2030.

“So much positive work is being put into improving the health of Wigan borough for all ages through campaigns like Heart of Wigan which encourage people to adopt healthy lifestyles and we hope that by 2030 the life expectancy levels will be even better than previously predicted and pushing closer to the national average.”

The forecasts were produced by combining data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) with computer modelling, with the historic gender gap also set to narrow.

The study shows average life expectancy for women will go up from 83.3 years in 2012 to 87.6 years in 2030, with the figures for men rising from 79.5 years to 85.7 years over the same period.

However, the figures also show huge regional differences with people in the more affluent south of England expected to live more than eight years longer than those in urban towns in the North West and South Wales.