More care services fail to meet CQC standards

Sir Ian McCartney
Sir Ian McCartney

Two more care services have failed inspections a week after it was revealed the majority of the borough’s homes have been told to improve.

Last week, our sister paper the Wigan Observer revealed how two thirds of the care homes in the borough have failed inspections by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) since it introduced a new criteria in October 2014.

An investigation showed that of the 27 homes that had been inspected since then, 16 had been rated as requiring improvement and two as inadequate.

Since then, another two homes, Care Choice North West Limited in Pemberton and Bedford Nursing and Residential Home in Leigh have been rated as requiring improvement, adding to what chairman of Healthwatch Wigan, Sir Ian McCartney, called a “crisis” in the borough’s care homes.

He said: “We are in the process of discussing what we think is a crisis in Wigan with the quality of the care homes.

“We are working with Wigan Council, who over the last few years have been trying their best to improve the situation.”

Bedford Nursing Home had been rated as requiring improvement at an inspection earlier in 2015 but a return visit was deemed necessary after concerns were raised following the initial visits by whistleblowers, family members and the local authority about staffing levels, the safe management of medicines, serious injuries and safeguarding.

But the visit saw additional concerns raised in relation to how the service was working within the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

As a result, the CQC rated how safe the service was as inadequate, meaning it had got worse since their initial in April when it was deemed to require improvement.

The home was rated as good for how caring and well-led the service was but remained as requiring improvement for its effectiveness and responsiveness.

Care Choice North West, a domiciliary care service which provides care to people living in their own homes, underwent an announced inspection in January.

Inspectors rated the service as good for how effective, caring and responsive it was but as requiring improvement for how safe and well-led it was.

Wigan Council said it is working with the CQC and its health partners to ensure residents “receive compassionate, high quality care and support”.