People caught throwing eggs could face fine

Several police forces, including North Yorkshire Police, are set to lose out under changes to the funding formula
Several police forces, including North Yorkshire Police, are set to lose out under changes to the funding formula
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POLICE have issued a warning about the consequences of misbehaving over the spooky season.

As part of the Treacle campaign, Greater Manchester Police have urged people to respect each other and stay safe this Halloween.

They have advised people who are trick or treating to go with an adult, visit people you know and respect others and not to go alone, damage property or intimidate people.

You don’t have to open the door to trick or treaters if you don’t want to. Draw your curtains and ignore the door. Don’t be frightened in your own home. If trick or treaters are causing a nuisance, call police on 101.

Police have already received several reports of eggs being thrown at houses and pumpkins being heartlessly stolen from outside homes.

Alex Mulvaney posted on GMP Wigan West’s Facebook page: “It’s sad that I should actually have to share this but two of my daughter’s pumpkins were stolen from outside of my window whilst I was in my house.

“My daughter is four and will be devastated in the morning. It looks well when you can’t even leave pumpkins outside of your house.”

GMP have warned that those caught throwing eggs could face a fine of up to £90.

They have also issued advice about bonfire night as part of the Treacle campaign and warned that anyone caught misusing fireworks will face the consequences.

They have advised people to attend an organised display and that anyone under 18 caught trying to buy fireworks faces a fine or a criminal record.

If you see anybody selling fireworks to under 18s, call police on 101.

Playing with fireworks can be fatal. Always use them responsibly.

Let the police know about any temporary shops that have opened and are selling fireworks.

Don’t leave bins out on Bbonfire night. Store them away.

People should always report antisocial behaviour to police on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.