Police and crime role ‘key’ to community ties

Tony Lloyd, the new Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner visits Wigan Life Centre, to meet representatives of various groups involved with the justice system
Tony Lloyd, the new Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner visits Wigan Life Centre, to meet representatives of various groups involved with the justice system
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WIGAN’S police and crime commissioner (PCC) has emphasised his counterparts can “increase public confidence in policing”.

A recent national survey has revealed a lack of public support for the new police chief system - a year on from its introduction.

But Greater Manchester’s commissioner Tony Lloyd - who was voted into his role with a turnout of 13.6 per cent - claimed PCCs can “transform the way forces interact with the public”.

Speaking at an event in London to mark the anniversary, Mr Lloyd said: “We will be discussing how we can maintain and increase confidence in policing, we are working hard to ensure local communities have a stronger voice.

“Working with chief constables we are transforming the way we interact so that policing is more responsive to communities’ concerns.”

Results of a public opinion poll, conducted by YouGov, this week revealed that nine per cent of those asked thought PCCs had helped to reduce crime in their area.

And 10 per cent agreed their PCC gave them more say in how their local area was policed.

Mr Lloyd, who attended the anniversary event in his role as chair of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners added: “Keeping crime low is also central to public confidence. Although recorded crime is down to record low levels, PCCs remain alert to the task. By working together and locally we can put victims at the heart of the justice system.

“And one of the key issues under discussion will be police integrity. We believe it is essential that the public trusts the process for handling police complaints.

“The process must be independent, transparent, involve communities and be fair to those under investigation.”

PCCs replaced police authorities last year and are elected for four year terms.

The low turnout during last year’s elections and the results of the recent poll has sparked criticism that the system does not have public backing.

n See On the Beat on Page 7 for more on crime commissioners.