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Rapper has ambassador ambitions

A Me B. Picture by Andy Brown

A Me B. Picture by Andy Brown

A YOUNG Wigan rapper hopes to inspire a new generation of youngsters to follow their dreams after being made an ambassador for a leading national youth charity.

Amy Burns, known in the music world by her stage name A Me B, accepted the role with Ambition UK, which supports youth clubs for more than 350,000 children and teenagers across the country, after performing at one of the organisation’s events.

Amy has already honed her motivational speaking skills with appearances helping to encourage young people to reach for the skies and achieve their hopes in life, acted as a compere and judge at an inter-club talent contest, and will also be touring the North West doing songwriting workshops from early next year.

For Golborne musician Amy, who went to Lowton Youth Club herself when she was younger, passing on some of the tips that have helped make her an up-and-coming star of the urban music scene and helping to inspire young people is something very close to her heart.

Amy, 20, said: “Going to the youth club helped me socialise and build my confidence, and I also did some drumming workshops there which helped develop my sense of rhythm and notation, improving my musical abilities.

“There’s not a great deal for young people in Wigan and in the North West in general to do, and music is a great way to engage them.

“I love what Ambition UK are doing, and working with young people is really rewarding. At the first session they were really unsure about starting and didn’t really know what to do, and by the end they were performing their songs and some of them told me they’d been writing lyrics at home too.”

Amy’s workshops will build on teaching skills that she has already been putting into practice on music courses she runs with young people in Warrington.

She will even be sharing some of the secrets of her own distinctive style of songwriting showcased on her recent mixtape Ups and Downs, which blends classic, old-school hip hop and rap with dance styles and a range of other eclectic influences.

Amy said: “I always start off with a beat and then get them to write down lots of ideas of what sort of mood it gives them and what pictures they get in their minds. I’ll start with basic things and escalate from there.

“It’s the starting point people tend to find the hardest, once they get that first line they usually on a roll.

“I’ve also been working this year with a girls’ group and by the end of the course they did their own music video and ended up with something really good.

“I even had one of the mums send me a message on Facebook to say thank you, which was really nice.”

 

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