Restaurateur offers up food for thought

Howard Gallimore, owner of Gallimore's Fine Restaurant at The Wiend
Howard Gallimore, owner of Gallimore's Fine Restaurant at The Wiend

A WIGAN restaurateur has branded a new foodie trend for serving dishes on wacky objects as “just ridiculous”.

Howard Gallimore is dismayed by an escalating craze among high-end restaurants of replacing plates with more non-traditional methods of serving up meals.

From sushi served in a sailing boat, steaks on slabs of slate and cocktails in telephone boxes to peas put in a latte mug, creative chefs at trendy eateries are increasingly ditching regular dishes for something far more unusual.

In gastro-pubs and restaurants across the country, culinary delights are frequently being served on random household objects.

For example, sauces at the Botanist restaurant chain are served in watering cans and in York afternoon tea now comes in a flat cap.

But Mr Gallimore of Gallimores Fine Dining Restaurant, The Wiend, says enough is enough.

Bring back the traditional methods. Of course diners appreciate great presentation of their food but serving your steak and gravy on a slate is just ridiculous

Howard Gallimore

He said: “This way of serving food is just not practical - it doesn’t even look good half of the time.

“Bring back the traditional methods. Of course diners appreciate great presentation of their food but serving your steak and gravy on a slate is just ridiculous.

“And you can’t really fit many chips into a tiny shopping trolley now can you?

“Chefs these days are trying to think of new and creative ways to be one step ahead of the game but instead they’re just turning fine dining into a joke. I remember seeing desserts served once in a watering can and other food in strange little objects and it was grossly overpriced for what it was.

“Wiganers want to see a good, quality, hearty meal which they can eat with no fuss. They don’t want to faff around for an hour trying to keep the gravy on their chopping board. It takes all of the fun out of eating.

“I don’t know any of the restaurants in the borough who use this method of serving their dishes in strange, little objects and I don’t think that will change as residents prefer the traditional way of having a meal.”

Now a campaign urging chefs to bring back plates has launched on Twitter with the handle @wewantplates.

Started by journalist Ross McGinnes, it originally began by encouraging diners to send in pictures of their food served in a less conventional way.

And it has attracted almost 20,000 followers within a matter of weeks and continues to grow. It’s clearly obvious what people want - plates and crockery of course!