Worst anti-social areas revealed

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WIGAN police chiefs are urging residents to report anti-social behaviour outbreaks as the borough’s worst hit areas were revealed.

Neighbourhood officers have issued the plea so that police priority plans can be built on accurate information and the right communities are targeted in a crackdown.

Force figures reveal almost 7,500 incidents have been reported between January and July of this year.

In Wigan West division, streets branching off Marsh Green’s main road and up to Kitt Green Road alone were the focus of 450 separate incidents, Wigan town centre generated 467, the Warrington Road area 219 and Ashton town centre 275.

In Wigan East, streets around Platt Bridge town centre saw police called 283 times and Hindley’s Borsdane Avenue 206, Railway Road and The Avenue in Leigh, 356, Shuttle Street in Tyldesley 185 and Hag Fold in Atherton in 256.

Several of the worst affected areas have been subject to dispersal orders in recent years which give the police powers to move on groups of two or more during certain hours.

Wigan town centre area has had such orders issued around Mesnes Park and the Gidlow area while Ashton has had one in its town centre and Jubilee Park.

The police figures reveal that anti-social behaviour incidents have accounted for almost 40 per cent of recorded crime in each division over the past 12 months.

Chief Insp Stuart Wrudd said: “We have seen a significant decline in anti-social behaviour across the borough in recent years. We have also seen a reduction in the fear that residents feel when it comes to anti-social behaviour as a result of our partnership work with the council and Wigan and Leigh Homes.

“Anti-social behaviour impacts a whole community and is something that we take very seriously. We think very carefully about how to deal with an incident or series of incidents, for example there may be opportunity to work between offenders and victims to bring peace back to a community.

“We will always try to do this if a victim decides that is how they would like to proceed.

“However, enforcement action is sometimes necessary and we work hard with the community and our partners to act fairly and quickly to resolve issues before they escalate.”