Grigg: We’ll pick up ‘sooner rather than later’

Will Grigg
Will Grigg

Will Grigg is hoping Wigan Athletic can revive their campaign ‘sooner rather than later’ under the guidance of Warren Joyce.

The 25-year-old is away on international duty this week with Northern Ireland, while his team-mates get to know the new manager behind closed doors at Euxton.

Grigg is back in the Northern Ireland fold after missing the last two squad gatherings due to personal reasons after becoming a new dad.

And he is hoping involvement against Azerbaijan in a massive World Cup qualifier in Belfast tomorrow night can pave the way for improved fortunes at club level as Latics move in a new direction.

“We started the season really well, but as a team we haven’t picked up the points we deserve,” Grigg acknowledged.

“There’s been a change of manager, and things have changed.

“We’re a good side, we’ve just lacked that little bit of spark, we’ve dominated most games, we’ve probably played two or three better sides than ourselves.

“It’s just one those things, sometimes it doesn’t go for you, and we feel that’s been happening.

“I’ve been in and out a little bit as well, so it’s hard to get that flow.

“But football changes quickly, that’s why we’ve got a new manager in now, and hopefully we’ll be turning things around sooner rather than later.”

Grigg dropped to the bench at the weekend for Joyce’s first game, a 3-0 home reversal at the hands of Reading.

But he is determined to play a key role in the new era at the DW Stadium.

“It’s only been a few days and he’s told us what he wants,” Grigg revealed.

“Straight away he’s working the boys hard, he’s got a great reputation in football, and knows a few of the lads already.”

Last season’s League One top goalscorer also admitted his ‘shock and disappointment’ at hearing Gary Caldwell had left the club only 14 games into the campaign.

“To be honest, yeah, the boys were shocked and disappointed, especially myself,” Grigg added. “He was brilliant for me.

“We started off okay, but that’s football, it changes so quickly and if results don’t come people are under pressure.

“It’s sad to see him go but, as a group of players and an individual, you have to move on quickly.”

In the meantime, Grigg remains fiercely determined to make his mark at international level, after his non-playing role at the Euros last summer.

“I went to France as a footballer, not as anything else, so to not play a minute was tough,” he acknowledged.

“It was really disappointing and it was a tough time.

“I went there as part of the squad, you’re not guaranteed to play, and that’s what happened.

“It’s one of those things, you have to get back quickly and there probably were a few question marks, whether I’d come back flying again - and I certainly did that.

“It wasn’t a case of me going back sulking, or anything like that, it was good to have a good start.

“I’m clever enough to realise that’s what happens in football – you get questioned constantly.

“I think that was always going to be a little question - whether that was justified or not - there was always going to be a doubt, and it’s nice to prove people wrong.

“It’s not necessarily made me more determined.

“I’ve always got that belief and desire to score goals and be the best I can.

“It’s always nice when you prove people wrong.”