We will change results, not philosophy - Caldwell

Gary Caldwell

Gary Caldwell

Gary Caldwell insists he has ‘100 per cent confidence’ that Wigan Athletic can arrest their current slump – without compromising his footballing philosophy and principles.

Latics sunk to the bottom of the Championship table over the weekend, with only one win and five points to their name from nine matches – a fifth of the campaign – played.

Friday night’s 1-0 defeat at Preston was a familiar tale of woe, with the visitors dominating in all areas apart from the one which matters.

But Caldwell remains steadfast in his belief Latics can play their way out of trouble without a sea-change in approach.

“Why would I change anything?” he told the Evening Post.

“Why would I change dominating games?

“Why would I change creating so many opportunities?

“I don’t see any reason to change.

“It’s up to us to change the results, and that’s up to me, the staff and the players – and we will.”

Despite being bottom of the second tier for the first time in their history, Caldwell says confidence levels remain unaffected ahead of tomorrow night’s visit of Wolves.

“I think if you were playing really poorly, and being beaten by better teams, I could see why heads would go down,” he said.

“But we’re controlling most games, we’re dominating most games.

“I don’t see why heads should go down when you’re playing well.

“Frustration would be a word I’d use, and I would hope the players are as frustrated as I am.

“And I would hope that then kicks them on to start winning games quickly, and go on a run of winning games.

“I think when we win one game, we could quite easily go on a run in this league.

“We have to keep believing. We have to keep working hard, trying to be better.

“We have to work on finishing, we have to look back on the (Preston) game and see the moments when we forced passes, when we didn’t see players in better areas.

“The players have got to take that on board – and that’s not a criticism.

“It’s something that’s going to help make them better players, so they can see the bigger picture.

“It’s easy from the side, but on the pitch it is difficult.

“The job for me and the coaching staff is to see the options we create, with the movement that we have, and the players have to then make those decisions.

“It is hard work...but I have 100 per cent confidence we will get there.”