Butchers Fayre: Wigan's finest straight from the Kings table

Doreen Walsh
Doreen Walsh

The story of Kings Fine Cooked Meats in Wigan goes back to 1888, when founder Frank King first opened up a butcher's stall in Wigan's famous Market Hall. That stall went from strength to strength, gaining a sterling reputation for quality and service, especially when it came to home-cooked meats.

Nowadays, Kings' produce can be found at Butchers Fayre, the town's one-stop shop for all things meaty.

Staff at Butchers Fayre (from left) Janet Wardhaugh, Doreen Walsh, Chris Hunt (back), Julie Robinson, Gillian Halliwell, Nathan Swain, and Pam Kenny.

Staff at Butchers Fayre (from left) Janet Wardhaugh, Doreen Walsh, Chris Hunt (back), Julie Robinson, Gillian Halliwell, Nathan Swain, and Pam Kenny.

Serving up everything from the finest hams, pork, and gammon to Sunday roast classics such as lamb, beef, and chicken, Butchers Fayre is Kings' modern-day butcher's stall, selling classic products cooked using traditional methods and recipes passed from generation to generation.

"It's a very good job, I love it," said Wigan-born manager Doreen Walsh, 63, who has worked at the butchers' for 15 years. "We've got a lot of customers who come week-in, week-out and we always make them welcome.

"It's a friendly place to work; we get to know people very well - we've got a lot of traders who've come here as long as I've worked here - and we like to provide people with the best quality products," she added.

Nine people work in the shop, and according to shop supervisor Janet Wardhaugh, 48, the atmosphere is great.

"All the girls who work here really get on well," said Janet, who has worked at Butchers Fayre for four years. "Day-to-day, I sort the deliveries and check the paperwork and log it on the computer system, I manage the stock and make sure it's rotated correctly, and I make sure the displays are right.

"You get a really good rapport with the customers, chatting about the rugby and the football," added Janet, who lives in Poolstock. "It's important to keep that local and personal feel."