A fitting tribute to Bowie

David Bowie
David Bowie
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STUART Maconie has paid tribute to David Bowie, describing his death as “a moment of huge and seismic generational grief.”

Writing a column for The Mirror, he said: “For those of us who grew up in the 1970s, the passing of David Bowie is a moment of huge and seismic generational grief. We knew the greatness and heft of Kennedy and Presley and Lennon – but even so, they felt like giants from a different era.

When I was a teenager I had a hard-as-nails, foul-mouthed garage mechanic mate who loved David Bowie

Stuart Maconie

“Bowie was ours, the first pop star of the post-Apollo age. He fell to Earth from Outer Space – well Brixton and Beckenham, actually – but he was an alien emissary come to save us from the three-day week and Gannex raincoats.

“We watched Starman and it was a moment of epiphany, of revelation – for a generation, for kids gay or straight, male or female, from the nation’s bad estates and provincial towns and stifling suburbs. It was a validation of the right to be strange, to be unusual, to be you. Suddenly it was OK to be weird or gay or geeky, a fey boy or a tough girl, a weed or a nerd, wonky-toothed or boss-eyed. Bowie was all these things and he was the coolest rock star ever. We tried to dress like him, dance like him, sing like him.

“When I was a teenager I had a hard-as-nails, foul-mouthed garage mechanic mate who loved David Bowie. He would sing Kooks and Oh You Pretty Things at the top of his voice when he was drunk – a joy to behold. I hope he was singing on his last night – with all the rest of the kooks across the world.”