Support your local chippy this fry-day

Adam Burns and Natalie Peacock from Alisons Fish and Chip restaurant
Adam Burns and Natalie Peacock from Alisons Fish and Chip restaurant
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National Fish and Chip Day takes place today and people all over the UK, from chip shops to fishermen, will be enjoying the iconic family favourite.

People across the country will be celebrating their love of the British staple from chippys, pubs and restaurants, to the fishermen and farmers who provide sustainable and natural ingredients used to create the mouth-watering meal.

At Alison’s Restaurant in Hindley - the 2018 Wigan Post Chippy of the Year - it will be business as usual on National Fish and Chip Day.

Adam Burns, owner of the Worthington Street eatery, said the secret to a good fish and chips experience is about more than just the food.

“It’s like a community,” he told the Post.

“It’s all about meeting new people and interacting with them, getting to know the customers. You really get to know them.”

He added: “Myself and the staff here ensure we give the best possible customer service, always going the extra mile.”

Customer service may be hugely important to the staff, but that’s not to say they don’t go all out to impress on food quality, however.

Adam said: “We ensure the quality of our foods is of the highest standards, sourcing the best potatoes from Lincolnshire, premium vegetable oils and fresh fish such as cod and haddock from sustainable sources, all freshly prepared daily on the premises.”

And it’s not just fish and chips being served up at Alison’s.

They also offer homemade specials such as full English breakfasts and delicious desserts like apple pie.

Fish and chips has always been a family affair for Adam.

He learned the trade at his dad’s chippy in Stretford, and when the opportunity to open up his own restaurant in an old post office, he grabbed it with both hands. Alison’s has been going strong for three years and prides itself on its friendly and comfortable eat-in and takeaway services.

The dish is so quintessentially British that it was even exempt from rationing during the Second World War, because the government felt it was so embedded in the nation’s culture that any limit would damage morale.

Even Winston Churchill recognised the crucial partnership of fish and chips, referring to them as “good companions.”

In fact, a survey carried out ahead of National Fish and Chip Day revealed us Brits consume an estimated 333.6 million portions of fish and chips each year, and nowhere eats more of it than Northerners.

More people eat fish and chips at least once a month in the North West than any other region.

Visit nationalfishandchipday.org.uk to find out more.