Hundreds of residents express anger at beauty spot landfill plan at packed public meeting

The packed public meeting
The packed public meeting

Hundreds of people packed into a public meeting to discuss controversial waste dumping plans at a local beauty spot.

John Herbert from Scarisbrick Parish Council chaired the meeting held at Parbold Village Hall and introduced the panel set up to fight the issue, Del Ellis (Stop Parbold Hill Landfill), Karen Martindale (Campaign to Protect Rural England), Penny Walker (resident) and local landowner and entrepreur Martin Ainscough.

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A planning application has been submitted for extensive work at the former Parbold Hill quarry including getting rid of the layby used by many vistors to enjoy the stunning views as far as North Wales.

Furious residents have pledged to do all they can to stop the plans and Parbold Parish Council has sent in a seven-page submission to Lancashire County Council outling their many objections.

Mr Ellis told the packed hall: “I know first-hand what it’s like to live on a road leading to a tip. When we bought our house near Rough Park tip, Up Holland, we were told the site had an 18-month life left. Permission was extended and extended. We left before it was complete.

“Did you know there are six landfills all within one and a half miles from here? I say we’ve had enough and more than our fair share! We’re becoming the dumping ground of the North West.”

Local resident Penny Walker, added: “In the area around the landfill consultants estimate that there is a medium/high risk of pollution.

“This will take the form of clouds of dust, and unpleasant odours combined with noise pollution from the lorries and machinery working in the quarry. If this application is successful the viewpoint will be an unpleasant place to be for the foreseeable future.”

“If you drive or cycle you’ll be dealing with at least 50,000 additional heavy lorry movements on our roads. Imagine the impact of diesel lorries on our air quality as they labour up and down Parbold Hill.”

Mr Ainscough urged everyone to write to Lancashire County Council and encourage others to do so.

He said: “Public opinion matters. So I ask you to write today. Our aim is to get over 1000 objections from the current level of about 300. We also need expertise in hydrology, ecology, planning consultants, and letter writers to express their views."