Readers' letters - March 16

Are young people being discriminated against?
Are young people being discriminated against?
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‘Young people suffering from discrimination’

For more letters: https://www.wigantoday.net/news/your-say/readers-letters-march-13-1-9067726

Young people have suffered stereotyping and discrimination because of their age for many years.
One of the ways in which the youth of today are treated poorly is work. Not only is it hard for 16-year-olds to find work, once they have, the discrimination does not stop.
Employers are required to pay young people average minimum wage. However, many businesses refuse to pay this. Companies often do not believe they deserve equal pay with workers who are older and possibly more experienced. This happens even if the younger employee is working equal shifts or equal hours to the older employee. Unfortunately, this is a small part of the discrimination.
‘Emos’, ‘Goths’ and ‘Chavs’ are just some of the names that ‘youths’ are called, by not only older generations but also by fellow young people. This, on most occasions, is solely because of the way they dress. This makes many young people feel they cannot dress the way they feel most comfortable, confident and free.
However, the older generations often hold a negative view of the people that dress this way based on stereotypes from when they were younger. This often leads to such fashions being associated with criminal, violent or threatening behaviour, therefore creating a negative image of them.
There is an assumption, mainly made by older generations, that because young people ‘hang around’ in groups they are intent on no good. The majority of the time this is untrue. In fact, they are passing their time or catching up with friends. This is due to the lack of facilities and youth clubs for them to meet in. This, in turn, is due to the Government cutting funding to local councils.
I strongly believe that the minimum voting age should be lowered as this will allow young people to have a say in the decisions that are made about their own futures.
Shona Rooney
via email

Sir Vince, it’s called democracy

Sir Vince Cable gave a speech at the Lib Dems conference stating that we, the older generation, had voted for Brexit out of nostalgia for a Britain where faces were white.
It sounds as if he is calling us all racist.
He and all the other remoaners will say anything that they feel is the reasoning behind our vote to leave.
Remember also that, when the vote was held to join the Common Market, the only reason there wasn’t the whining and wailing was because the vote went as the establishment wanted it
to go and we, who voted not to join, accepted the decision.
It’s called democracy.
Also remember when the country voted to join the Common Market, a huge number voting were “the older generation”.
I, along with the majority of Brexiteers, voted for a lot more reasons than immigration.
The list is endless but we should gain control of our borders and our laws without, among other things, the shackles of the Human Rights Act as dictated by judges and lawyers from abroad.
We want to regain our territorial waters from Spanish fishing factories and let our farmers get on with growing our food.
Remember, just after we voted out, how we were warned of the impending disasters?
Well, we are still waiting.
We are told by think-tanks that, in 15 years’ time, we will be in dire straits.
Come on... they can’t get predictions right for a couple of months’ time, so what chance years?
These are the same people that told us when we joined the Common Market, that my kids and grandkids will see a glorious future.
Still waiting.
So Sir Vince, with your party’s seven per cent of the national vote, accept the vote of the people as democracy dictates.
Word to the wise.
The grey vote is a huge one and we use our vote.
Remember, we have long memories and a few of us will still be here come the next elections.
Steve Roberts
via email

A great role model for all

Stephen Hawking was a great scientist who helped in our understanding of the universe, even if most people couldn’t understand his work.
He was also a very successful author.
His work included black holes which may be symbolic.
He did not wallow in a personal black hole when he became ill but rather fought it and showed that handicaps do not stop
you.
His humour and wit was shown through his cameos on Big Bang Theory.
A piece of trivia – he was the only person to appear on Star Trek as themselves.
A great role model for all.
Dennis Fitzgerald
via email