Wigan Athletic boss on transfer progress

Leam Richardson provided an progress report on Wigan Athletic's transfer business with just over two weeks to go before the window slams shut.

After a desperately quiet summer, with only Ryan Nyambe arriving during the off-season, things have really cranked up in the last week.

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On Tuesday, Nathan Broadhead arrived on a season-long loan from Everton.

Leam Richardson

Then, on Friday, Ashley Fletcher put pen to paper on a similar arrangement from Watford.

Latics still remain three bodies down on last season's numbers, but Richardson appeared far happier about the situation than he was.

"Everybody knows, with no depth of squad, you're never going to get any type of success," he said.

"Because we all know about the Championship and how tough it is.

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"I've been here before and I know what levels of competition you need to keep pushing on and driving on.

"I certainly want to get out of this league in a good way, in good form, and work at the highest level.

"This is the next step, to try and consolidate, and see where we go.

"To bring in the right quality of person as well as player we've done so far is pleasing."

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Latics pipped Rotherham to the signature of Fletcher, who Richardson is looking forward to working with.

"It's an important part of the pitch, it's goals, and it's also the right character," the Latics boss added.

"He brings the right kind of attributes into our dressing room, and he wants to buy into what we're doing.

"I won't let anyone dip under the bar we have here.

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"The lads keep on raising that bar themselves, and it's my job to keep everyone at it.

"There's some lads, like Thelo (Aasgaard), who don't know where their bar is yet, and it's about educating them and pushing them on."

Richardson also praised the impact made by Aasgaard, who replaced Joe Bennett at half-time against Bristol City.

"He's still a very young lad who's learning the game but, in a perfect world, he'd be playing every week,” Richardson said.

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"He trains well enough that you can't ignore him, and that's all you can do as a young pro.

"His habits are good, he wants to improve and learn, he wants to be out there, and I'd have no qualms about using him whenever.”